~ The United States Has Some Nerves ~  

The hanging of an Iranian woman (Reyhaneh Jabbari) convicted of murdering a former intelligence officer she claimed had tried to sexually assault her was tragic, senseless, and wrong. Also, as Jen Psaki(spokeswoman) of the US States Department said, “there were serious concerns with the fairness of the trial, and the circumstances surrounding the case”.Well, spokeswoman for the States Department, Jen Psaki should know what she’s talking about, seeing as how she’s from the U.S., and its injustice system is shot all to hell. She went on to point out that, among those concerns were “reports of confessions made under severe duress”. So, for those reason (among others) the United States decided to condemn the hanging of Reyhaneh Jabbari, which is the right, civilized, and just thing to do. However, what perplexes me is, how can a country be so very diligent in pointing out other countries mistakes, and flaws, but turn a blind eye to its own?!


Where is Jen Psaki, spokeswoman for the State Department, when the numerous, and serious concerns with the fairness of trials, and egregious mistakes continually show themselves in death penalty cases all across “this Nation”?


Where does the state Department stand on such things going on in its very own backyard? Does the State Department condemn its very own states for executing its citizens, among major concerns of unfair trials, and confessions made under severe duress? If so, why aren’t they speaking out?


Why hasn’t spokeswoman Jen Psaki of the States Department taken to the podium on behalf of the United States, and its States Department to condemn its very own flawed injustice system?! I guess, that would be too much like right. Besides, isn’t it just easier to point out the flaws, and mistakes of others … rather than look in the mirror, and face your own?!


The United States needs to look in the mirror and stop calling others ugly. The U.S. has some nerves, huh!

Be blessed, be strong,
be educated, and be vocal …
Oppose Death Penalty,
Anthony Boyd

last update: 01/22/2015